Plenary talks

Plenary lectures

The following plenary lectures will be given

  1. Caroline Kerfoot: “Indexicalities of ‘race’, ethnicity and gender: analysing data in multilingual contexts”
  2. Johanna Mesch: “Creating resources for sign language: The Case of Swedish sign language”
  3. Julia Sallabank: “Language documentation and language policy”
  4. Francisco Lacerda: "Experimental methodologies to investigate early language acquisition"
  5. Catrin Norrby: “Interaction and Variation in Pluricentric Languages. The Case of Swedish in Sweden and Finland”
  6. Peter K. Austin: "Interactions and interplays between language documentation and revitalisation"
  7. Östen Dahl: “Language complexity”


Caroline Kerfoot: “Indexicalities of ‘race’, ethnicity and gender: analysing data in multilingual contexts”

  • Draws on data from multilingual classrooms and playgrounds in South Africa where new discourses and practices of identity, language, class, gender, ‘race’ and ethnicity become entangled with local economies of meaning.
  • Uses  Linguistic Ethnography as epistemological and methodological framework to illuminate the construction of identities across difference -Explores, in particular, the identities generated by particular discursive moves, the temporary orders of interaction (Goffman 1983) they shape, and the more enduring social and cultural processes they index.


Johanna Mesch: “Creating resources for sign language: The Case of Swedish sign language”


Julia Sallabank: “Language documentation and language policy”

Language policy is any decision that is made about language. Language policy permeates every aspect of people’s lives, and so linguists need to consider policy issues as soon as they start researching: e.g. contact with communities may depend on who is seen as having the authority to make decisions on language use; and a baseline sociolinguistic survey may entail considering political factors. Languages often decline because communities are marginalised, which in turn relates to language rights and human rights. Policies may be conscious or unconscious, explicit or implicit: for example, ‘benign neglect’ of minority languages. Whether or not we think we are experts on language policy, as linguists we have a certain prestige, and people may start acting on what we say. We may also well be called on to advise on policy, at all levels from individual to governmental, so it is useful to have some knowledge of them.
 

Francisco Lacerda: "Experimental methodologies to investigate early language acquisition"

The lecture will introduce the basic principles of experimental techniques used to study language processing in infants. It will also be discussed how the empirical results can be integrated into plausible and testable models accounting for the emergence of linguistic awareness in infancy and early childhood.
 

Catrin Norrby: “Interaction and Variation in Pluricentric Languages. The Case of Swedish in Sweden and Finland”

Many languages are so-called pluricentric languages, i.e. languages that have national or official status in more than one country. Previous research on the use of such languages has predominantly concerned variation in e.g. pronunciation, vocabulary and morphology, while pragmatic and interactional variation have attracted much less research interest to date.  In my plenary lecture I present an on-going large-scale research project on communicative patterns in the two national varieties of Swedish: Finland Swedish and Sweden Swedish. The discussion will be based on a micro level analysis of naturally occurring conversations in different settings, such as service encounters, doctor-patient interactions and university supervision meetings. The pragmatic and interactional variation found between the two national varieties, e.g. in terms of formality and social distance, will also be discussed in light of the larger socio-cultural context of each nation.
 

Peter K. Austin: "Interactions and interplays between language documentation and revitalisation"

This lecture will discuss whether language documentation can be related to language revitalisation, and how research and practice in each area might inform the other. A case study of work with the Dieri Aboriginal Corporation, South Australia, will be presented.

Readings

  • Austin, Peter K. 2014. Language documentation in the 21st century. LIPP 3, 57-71.
  • Amery, Rob. 2009. Phoenix or Relic? Documentation of Languages with Revitalization in Mind. Language Documentation and Conservation 3, 138-148.
  • Francis, Norbert and Pablo Rogelio Navarrete Gómez. 2009. Documentation and Language Learning: Separate Agendas or Complementary Tasks? Language Documentation and Conservation 3, 176–191.
  • Nathan, David and Meili Fang. 2013. Re-imagining Documentary Linguistics as a Revitalisation-driven Practice. In Mari Jones and Sarah Ogilvie (eds.) Keeping Languages Alive: Documentation, Pedagogy and Revitalization, 42-55. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Nathan, David. 2006. Thick interfaces: Mobilizing language documentation with multimedia”. In Jost Gippert, Nikolaus P. Himmelmann and Ulrike Mosel (eds.) Essentials of Language Documentation, 363-379. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyer.
     

Östen Dahl: “Language complexity”

In this lecture I will discuss different notions of complexity in general and linguistic complexity in particular; how linguistic complexity is increased and reduced in processes of language change; if there is variation between languages with regard to complexity and if such variation is related to differences in the ”ecology” of languages.

Contact

Local organizers
Maria Koptjevskaja Tamm (chair)
Hanna Rönnqvist (secretary)

For questions, contact:
summerschool@ling.su.se

Important dates

December 20 (2013): Registration opens
April 30: Early registration closes
May 30: Registration closes!
June 23–July 4:  Summer School
June 28:  Young Linguists' International Conference

Young Linguists' International Conference

Important dates:
Submission of abstracts: February 14, 2014
Notification of participants: March 31, 2014

Young Linguists' International Conference: June 28, 2014

Facebook group for organizers and participants

Link to our informal Facebook group